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We are a national charity creating a brighter future for young people

We are a national charity creating a brighter future for young people

We are a national charity creating a brighter future for young people

We have an outstanding 20-year record, improving the lives of young people from 18 months to 18 years through the power of sport. We create, develop and deliver programmes and initiatives that improve health, attendance, academic achievement and raise whole-school standards, equipping all young people with skills for life.

Latest news

National children’s charity supports over 750,000 children to be fit for life

National children’s charity supports over 750,000 children to be fit for life

More than 750,000 young people have been engaged in programmes designed to improve their life chances through the work of the Youth Sport Trust.
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BLOG: Secondary PE - time to step up and be counted?

BLOG: Secondary PE - time to step up and be counted?

Following our research in to secondary PE provision, YST's Will Swaithes blogs on his fears that if we don’t act in a coordinated and collaborative bid to save PE, it may be lost for good.
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BLOG: Giving young people with SEND a voice

As we start a new school term, this blog focuses on the importance of including all young people in decision making, and the key questions Governors and Trustees should be asking to ensure true diversity of thought in our schools.
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Our impact

639,668

young people were given direct opportunities by the Youth Sport Trust to participate in high quality PE and sport in 2016/17

136,025

young people were given training opportunities through the Youth Sport Trust in 2016/17, including coaching, officiating and volunteering

25,740

teachers received continuing professional development training from the Youth Sport Trust in 2016/17

21,592

schools worked with the Youth Sport Trust across all of our programmes in 2016/17, including 1,677 in the most deprived areas of England